Jeff Kauffman

Jeff Kauffman is a photographer in Austin, Texas USA. His work has appeared worldwide in publications, art shows, and corporate spaces. Read more at Jeff Kauffman Photography.

The visual rhythms of utilities

Metering #0005, electrical installation photograph by Jeff Kauffman

Photographs and Text by Jeff Kauffman. Arrays of electric and gas fixtures often provide unique geometric shapes and visual rhythms. In the back alleys and side streets of commercial areas, you will find these creations adorning the walls of the buildings

Kite flying on the Texas coast

Showable Art - Kite flying in Port Aransas, Texas

Photography and Text by Jeff Kauffman. The stiff offshore breeze from the Gulf of Mexico makes kite flying a popular pastime along the coast of Texas. The colors first caught my eye, and then the flow of the long tails captured my interest. The continuous rising and falling, twisting and turning made for fun compositions

Pleasure Pier is candy for the eyes

Galveston Pleasure Pier in B&W #131129A0312. Photograph by Jeff Kauffman.

Photography and text by Jeff Kauffman. The billboards along Interstate 45 approaching Galveston were intriguing. My imagination was working up some very colorful expectations. Those expectations were not met, of course, as Pleasure Pier is a family amusement pier jutting into the Gulf of Mexico

Frenzied Oaks whip violently in the powerful winter wind

Live Oak treetops whip in the wind. Photograph by Jeff Kauffman (141129A0014).

Photography and Text by Jeff Kauffman. When the winter winds come to Texas, the tops of the Live Oak trees whip violently while their decades-old, often centuries-old, trunks remain motionless. Unlike oak trees native to other parts of North America, Live Oaks are evergreen and have twisted, craggy limbs shooting off in all directions. They are sculptural in an abstract sense.

A Matchbox Car Collection Becomes Art

Showable Art - Mercury White Police car Matchbox Series No. 55/73

Photography and Text by Jeff Kauffman. Until the early 1970s, Janet worked most of her adult life at a corner store in a rural Pennsylvania town. As each new toy reached the store, Janet purchased it for her growing collection. “They might be worth something someday”, she would say.